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Mark Rauterkus

What does it mean? Sprawl.

Burb to burb for workers and residents -- so as to bypass the urban centers -- means more sprawl. This also means that the city is going to continue its decay. And, the best way to deal with the city's decay is to make the urban core more suburban. Density diminishes. More green space comes, because the space is ample.

Then, the value in the city shrinks. Bigger tax burdens are needed in the burbs too. Hence, take-overs of the city and regionalization of government is pressed.

Oh well. In Pittsburgh, we didn't build a beltway. Our city has a chance because of our roads in the burbs are generally lacking. If the Orange Belt was six or more lanes, we'd have a different tune to sing around here.

sean mcdaniel

"Oh well. In Pittsburgh, we didn't build a beltway"
—Mark Rauterkus

Mark,
Ever take a look at the topography around here? Not building a beltway wasn't an oversight. It would be nearly impossible to construct the typical beltway here.

Despite what J. Morris thinks, most major roads here lead to Pittsburgh. They don't skirt around town. Which, I agree, gives us a chance.

John Morris

Mark says,

"Burb to burb for workers and residents -- so as to bypass the urban centers -- means more sprawl. This also means that the city is going to continue its decay. And, the best way to deal with the city's decay is to make the urban core more suburban. Density diminishes. More green space comes, because the space is ample.

Then, the value in the city shrinks. Bigger tax burdens are needed in the burbs too. Hence, take-overs of the city and regionalization of government is pressed."

I really, coudn't have said it better. The cycle is clear- loosing, your residents means that eventually, the jobs will follow. In a city, like L.A. in which the city includes so much of it's suburbs this could be called semi sustainable but here, it means the outright death of the city as a city. This situation is clear in that big employers here now have so much leverage to get tax breaks or subsidies to stay in town.

Finally, Ney York has reached a level of density and critical mass. An employer looking to make a major move out of NY, can count on loosing a huge chunk of their best employees. You can build a big tower on the Jersey waterfront, accross from Wall Street, but any moves further out are really tough for anything but pure worker drone functions.

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